JFK Lancer News

Home

Site map

Contact us

Subscribe

JFK Presidency Assassination Information NEWS 1997 - 2001

NEWS 2004

Dallas Conferences Video, Audio & Photos NEWS 2002
Online Store
       

From "Findings and Conclusions of the Firearms Panel Concerning the Kennedy Assassination"

Kennedy Shooting

Evidence examined

(Page 365)

(97) The following evidence was examined in connection with the shooting of President Kennedy.

(98) CE 139(71)--One 6.5 millimeter caliber, bolt-action repeating rifle, Mannlicher-Carcano Model 1938, serial number C2766. Attached was an Ordinance Optics, Inc. 4X telescopic sight and an adjustable black leather strap.* (See figs. 3A and 3B.)

(100) A visual examination of the rifle revealed pitting, rust and copper oxidation to test-firing, which the panel believed should be removed prior to test-firing. Accordingly, a dry cloth patch was pushed through the bore.

(101) The telescopic sight was attached to a mount, which itself was attached to the left side of the rifle. Mounting facilities were not provided at the time of manufacture. Also attached to the rifle were standard iron sights, placed on the rifle at the time of manufacture.

(102) The rifle was test-fired by all panel members using 6.5 millimeter caliber ammunition of Western cartridge Co. manufacture. Two bullets were test-fired into a horizontal water recovery tank. Further tests were conducted by loading four cartridges into the CE 375 cartridge clip and inserting it into the magazine of the rifle. The cartridges were worked through the rifle's mechanism and ejected without being fired. When the last cartridge was chambered, the cartridge clip remained in the magazine instead of falling out as it is designed to do.

(103) CE 141.--One 6.5-millimeter caliber cartridge of Western Cargridge Co. manufacuture, found in the CE 139 reflects. (See fig. 4.)

(104) CE 351.--One damaged automobile windshield removed from the Presidential limousine. (See fig. 5)

(105) CE 399.--One fired 6.5-millimeter caliber full meter-jacketed bullet, found on a stretcher in the emergency area of Parkland Hospital. The bullet weight was found to be 157.7 grains. (72) In the same box as the bullet was a tiny fragment, which was too small to weigh or otherwise examine. (See figs. 6A and 6B.)
---------------------------------

Page 366

(106) CE 542.--One 6.5-millimeter caliber, bolt-action repeating rifle, Mannlicher-Carcano model 1938, serial No. UC5209. Attached was 4 x Ordnance Optics, Inc., telescopic sight and an adjustable black leather strap. The strap is consistent in length, design, and construction with the strap on the CE 139 rifle. The rifle was purchased by the FBI in order to compare the method of mounting the telescopic sight. (See fig. 7.)

(107) CE 543.--One expended caliber 6.5-millimeter cartridge case of Western Cartridge Co. manufacture, recovered from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository. (See figs. 8A and SB.)

(108) CE 544--One expended 6.5-millimeter caliber cartridge case of Western Cartridge Co. manufacture, recovered from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository. (See fig. 9.)

(109) CE 545.--One expended 6.5*millimeter caliber cartridge case of Western Cartridge Co. manufacture, recovered from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository. (See fig. 10.)

(110) CE 557.--Two expended 6.5-millimeter caliber cartridge cases of Western Cartridge Co. manufacture, test-fired by the FBI laboratory in the CE 139 rifle for purposes of comparison with CE CE 544, and CE 545. (See Warren Commission hearings, vol. 249).

(111) CE 567.--The nose portion of a 6.5-millimeter caliber metaljacketed bullet found on the right side of the front seat of the Presidential limousine. (See fig. 11.)
base portion of a metal-jacketed bullet found on the floor beside the right side of the front seat of the Presidential limousine. (See fig. 12.)

(113) CE 572.--Two fired 6.5-millimeter caliber full metal-jacketed bullets, test-fired by the FBI from the CE 139 rifle and designated as K1A and K1B. (See fig. 13.)

(114) CE 573--One 6.5 millimeter caliber metal-jacketed bullet recovered from the residence of General Walker in April 1963 after an attempted assault. (See fig. 14.)

(115) CE 575.--One brass cartridge clip with a six--cartridge capacity, stamped "SMI 952," removed from the CE 139 rifle. (See fig. 15.)

(117) CE 840.--Two lead-like fragment** recovered from the rug underneath or in the area which was underneath the left jump seat of the Presidential limousine. (73) The panel found that each fragment weighed 0.5 grain. Because of their minute size, no further examinations were conducted on this exhibit. (See fig. 16.)

(118) CE 841.---One round metal box containing lead residue recovered by the FBI from the inside surface of the windshield of the Presidential limousine. Because of the small size of the sample, further examinations were not conducted. (See hearings before the Warren Commission, vol. 17, p. 840. )
---------------------------------
**Note: The FBI originally recovered three particles. In 1970, an independent researcher brought to the attention of the National Archives that one of the three fragments was missing. The Archives has been unable to locate it.

Page 367

(119) CE 842.--Four lead-like fragments. The smallest was identified as having come from Governor Connally's arm. The panel found that the largest fragment weighed 0.3 grain. The other fragments were too small to weigh. Because of the small size of the fragments, no further examinations were conducted on this exhibit. (See fig. 17).

(121) CE 843. Three lead-like fragments removed from President Kennedy's brain during the autopsy. The largest weighs 0.6 grain; their combined weight is 0.7 grain. Because of the small size of the fragments, no examinations were conducted on this exhibit. (See fig. 18.)

(122) CE 853--One fired 6.5-millimeter caliber full metal-jacketed bullet, fired through a goat at the request of the Warren Commission to ascertain the characteristics of the bullet on penetration and its subsequent loss of velocity. The pane] found that fruitful examination of this bullet was not practical. (See hearings before the Warren Commission, vol. 17, p. 819.)

(123) CE 856.--One fired 6.5-millimeter caliber full metal-jacketed bullet, test-fired through a cadaver's wrist at the request of the Warren Commission to ascertain the characteristics of the bullet on penetration and its loss of velocity on impact. The panel found that fruitful examination of this bullet was not practical. (See hearings before the Warren Commission, vol. 17, p. 850.)

(124) CE 857.--Once fired 6.5-millimeter caliber full metal jacketed bullet, test-fired into a skull at the request of the Warren Commission to ascertain the characteristics of the bullet on penetration. The panel found that the jacket had been separated from the core. The panel also found that fruitful examination of the bullet was not practical. (See hearings before the Warren Commission, vol. 17, p. 851.)

(125) Lester Bullet. One fired metal-jacketed soft or hollow point bullet found in 1974 by Richard Lester about 500 yards from the Texas School Book Depository and 61 paces east of the triple overpass abutment. (See fig. 19.)

 


Was the CE 567 bullet nose portion found on the right side of the front seat of the Presidential limousine fired from the CE 139 Mannlicher-Carcano rifle?

(139) CE 567 is the nose portion of a damaged 6.5-millimeter caliber full metal-jacketed, lead core bullet. The weight of the exhibit is 41.5 grains. The class characteristics on the jacket are four lands and four grooves. The panel could not determine the direction of twist.

(140) The panel found the physical characteristics of this bullet fragment to be the same as the bullet portion of the CE 141 cartridge found in the chamber of the CE 139 rifle. When it compared CE 567 with the two CE 572 bullets test-fired by the FBI in the CE 139 rifle, it noted a correspondence among the individual identifying characteristics. (See fig. 23A and 23B.)

(141) The panel concluded that all were fired through the same barrel.

(142) The panel also compared CE 567 with bullets it test-fired in the CE 139 rifle. The panel was unable to identify its tests with CE 567. The panel attributed this to changes in the bore caused by repeated firing of the rifle by the FBI and the Infantry weapons Evaluation Branch of the U.S. Army to test its accuracy, (76) as well as deterioration of the surfaces because the rifle had not been properly cleaned, lubricated, and maintained. For the same reasons, the panel was unable to identify its test-fired bullets with those of the FBI. The panel's test-fired bullets also could not be identified with each other, probably as a consequence of the poor condition of the barrel.

Was the CE 569 bullet-base portion found on the floor beside the right front seat of the Presidential limousine fired from the CE 139 rifle?

(143) CE 569 is a bse portion of a damaged 6.5-millimeter caliber full metal-jacketed, lead core bullet. The weight of 20.6 grains. The rifling impressions on the jacket are four lands and four groves, right twist. The physical characteristics of this bullet are the same as the bullet portion of the CE 141 cartridge found in the chamber of the CE 139 rifle.

(144) The panel microscopically compared this bullet jacket with the two bullets (CE 572) test fired by the FBI from the CE 139 rifle. Correspondence of individual identifying characteristics was found on CE 569 and the FBI test-fired bullets. (See figs. 24A and 24B.)

(145) The panel concluded that the CE 569 was fired through the same barrel as the FBI test-fired bullets.

(146) Next, the panel compared CE 569 with bullets it test fired in the CE 139 rifle. The panel was unable to identify its tests with the

Page 370

CE 569. The panel attributed this to changes in the bore caused by repeated firings of the rifle by the FBI and the Infantry Weapons Evaluation Branch of the U.S. Army to test its accuracy,(77) as well as to deterioration of the surfaces because the rifle had not been properly cleaned, lubricated, and maintained. For the same reasons, the panel was unable to identify its test-fired bullets with those of the FBI. The panel's test-fired bullets also could not be identified with each other, probably as a consequence of the poor condition of the barrel.

Were the CE 567 bullet nose portion and the CE 569 bullet base portion found in the Presidential limousine components of the same bullet?

(147) The panel was unable to determine whether CE 567 and CE 569 were components of the same bullet. The panel weighed and measured the fragments and found their combined weight and lenght did not exceed that of a single-fired projectile. Nevertheless, the panel could not match the two fragments physically because a considerable portion of the bullet jacket was absent.

(148) Both bullet fragments were examined for cannelures. The panel found only one cannelure present; it was on the base portion of the CE 569 bullet.

(149) Was the CE 573 bullet recovered from the residence of General Walker fired from the CE 139 rifle? (149) CE 573 consists of a damaged 6.5-millimeter caliber full metaljacketed, lead core bullet. The weight of this exhibit is 147.1 grains. The class characteristics are four lands and four grooves, right twist. (See fig. 14.)

(150) The panel compared this bullet microscopically with the FBI's and its own test-fired bullets. Correspondence among the class characteristics was found on all bullets. No significant correspondence was, however, found among the individual identifying characteristics. Conversely, gross differences were not found.

(151) The panel concluded that because of the damage to CE 573 caused by impact and penetration, it could not be identified or eliminated as having been fired from the CE 139 rifle.


Lab Tests on JFK Evidence Complete

Latest News (1-21-00)| Article | Photos | Press Reports

NARA Test Report Here | Excerpts from HSCA Ballistic Panel

HOME

SEARCH CONTACT FORUM SITEMAP Bookmark and Share